/blogs/news.atom Jacksonville Clay Target Sports - News 2019-06-09T12:01:00-04:00 Jacksonville Clay Target Sports /blogs/news/summer-raffle-a400-excel-50-ticket 2019-06-09T12:01:00-04:00 2019-06-09T12:02:40-04:00 Summer Raffle! A400 Excel $50/ticket! Jack Shooting Get your tickets now for JCTS' Summer Raffle! Tickets are only $50 and we are giving away some great items!

1st - 30" 12ga Beretta A400 XCEL Sporting

2nd - Pilla Panther Max 3.0 Performance Eye-Wear Package

3rd - Minn Kota Trolling Motor

Only 200 tickets are being sold. The drawing will be held the Wednesday after the last ticket is sold so, hurry up and get your tickets now!

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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-station-1-detailed-tips 2019-02-01T13:00:00-05:00 2019-02-01T13:00:00-05:00 Skeet Shooting - Station 1 Detailed Tips: Jack Shooting As we build our Skeet game, we look to reduce the many variables involved in shooting a single or a pair into a set of consistent, precise actions which can be learned, practiced and perfected.

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In August of 2018, we covered the baseline stations (1, 7, 8) altogether in one article. This month we will cover station 1 in more detail.  As we build our Skeet game, we look to reduce the many variables involved in shooting a single or a pair into a set of consistent, precise actions which can be learned, practiced and perfected. By doing this we are giving ourselves the highest probability of breaking each target each time all day long.  Station 1 is where each round in a skeet tournament begins, aside from shoot off doubles which begins at station 3.  

The basics for shooting station 1 are as follows:

Station 1 – High 1

  • Stance: Use a stance that allows you to turn smoothly and completely in the event that the low 1 on the double comes across low and fast. Right Handed shooters “open” our stance, facing your belly button slightly to the left on the low house window, left-handed shooters face straight out to the open field.
  • Hold Point: Usually a 45-degree angle but be conservative to not hold too high so that the target does not come out and fly under your barrel. 
  • Look point: After you line the beads up, the look point is 3” above the barrel
  • Shot Execution: Settle your eyes with a soft focus for (.5 - .75 sec), call for the target, when the target comes into your look point assure you are lined up and shoot.

Station 1 – Low 1

  • Stance: Same as High 1
  • Hold Point: 10’ to the left of the low house window, level with the bottom of the window
  • Look Point: Halfway back to the window, up on the flight path of the target
  • Shot Execution: Settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 6” – 1’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This long incomer is a great target for us to practice patience, matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field).

Station 1 – Double

  • Stance: Hold Point and Look Point – same as High 1
  • Shot Execution: Settle, call, shoot when high 1 comes into your look point, with head tight on the gun, the gun moves lower, eyes shift up to the center of the field, find, track and shoot Low 1 the same as the single.

Now let’s discuss some details for you to consider for your game. Note the following tips are what I practice in order to be more precise and consistent.  As you review you may “calculate” that the perceived advantage gained is potentially small, however, the point is to accrue all of these advantages together into what turns out to be a larger advantage which may turn out to be the difference of one or two additional targets broken each round or each 100. You can try some of the tips in your practice to see what works best for your skeet game.

Station 1 – High 1

  • Foot Position – My heels are close to the back of the station (near the High house wall. For a left-handed shooter, their outside of their left foot would be close to the wall, but still allowing for enough room to mount the gun and turn smoothly without touching the wall. (This gives me a bit more room to see the target earlier, a foot or so, while on the same side of the field that we are shooting from.)
  • Foot Position: While most shooters select a stance that has their belly button in the low house window, or facing directly out towards the field for a left-handed shooter, I use a more “open” stance that has my belly button in between the center stake and the low house window.  This allows me an additional range to turn and shoot a low 1 target that comes across lower and or faster than expected.  The left-hand shooter does not need to adjust anything at this station as they are already well prepared for a low and or fast low 1 target.  

  • Sample Targets: Since this is the start of the round, together, all shooters are offered a high, low, and a pair in order to see where the targets are flying with respect to the center stake as well as the distance markers.  This is the time to determine what adjustments you will make. The wind and the sun can often provide some challenges here in selecting a hold point.  Shooting in the early morning around the Florida area, high 1 can require a second set of sunglasses or a set of welding glasses in order to have the best chance of seeing and shooting the target, especially in the first round of a 100-target shoot.  What I usually try to assure is to not hold “too high” where the target comes out and dives under the gun so quickly that I do not have time to pull the trigger.  Skeet is an outdoor sport, subject to a variety of weather conditions that are changing all the time.  What your practice targets, decide what if any adjustments you need to make and then execute your shot routine when it is your turn.

  • Patience is key here, for high 1 have your look point 3” above the bead – let your eyes “settle”, soft focus, at this look point before calling.  After you call, when the target enters your look point, make any left-right adjustment necessary and pull the trigger.
Station 1 – Low 1
  • After a successful high 1, I dismount and go through my shot routine for a low 1 target. Since I load 2 shells, while I dismount, I continue to look over at the low house so my eyes stay focused for that distance.  

  • Foot position: Adjusted as per above so that I can turn smoothly while tracking and shooting the low target which on a windy day, or due to the sun needs to be shot later than usual.
Station 1 – Double
  • Same as High 1
  • Stance: Hold Point and Look Point – same as High 1
  • Foot Position: is already adjusted to handle a low and fast low 1 2ndtarget coming across.
Hopefully, you are patient, let the shots develop and come off the station with a clean start!

Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American
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/blogs/news/februarys-message-from-the-president 2019-01-30T11:00:00-05:00 2019-01-30T11:00:00-05:00 February's Message from the President: Jack Shooting The “Fish Fry”, which the club will host from February 22nd to the 24th is filling up so if you are interested in shooting in it please register now.

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I want to take this opportunity to recognize TJ Hawk.  TJ won our 2018 Club Championship breaking 96 out of 100 targets between 50 Sporting Clays, 25 Skeet and 25 Trap.  TJ has been an active member of our Club and is both an NSCA and NSSA Level 1 certified instructor. He is a competitive shooter and consistently places very high in both Sporting Clays and Skeet tournaments. Congratulations TJ for being our current Club Champion!

t-j-hawk

 

The “Fish Fry”, which the club will host from February 22nd to the 24th is filling up so if you are interested in shooting in it please register now. 

Mark your calendars for Saturday, April 27, 2019.  The Club will host a friendly competition shooting only the .410 on the North Course. It should be fun!

As always I want to thank everyone for their patronage. We are all fortunate to have such a Club that we all can enjoy.

See you at the Club!

Chris Kauffmann
President 

 

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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-skeet-season-preparation-by-russ-naples-jcts-skeet-chairman 2019-01-04T12:30:00-05:00 2019-01-09T14:09:32-05:00 Skeet Shooting - Skeet Season Preparation: by Russ Naples, JCTS Skeet Chairman Jack Shooting  Following up from last month’s article “Skeet Season Wrap-up”, this month’s article is focused on preparing for the upcoming skeet season.

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Skeet Shooting - Skeet Season Preparation:  by Russ Naples, JCTS Skeet Chairman 

Hopefully, everyone had a nice holiday season and with the start of the new year comes hope, excitement, and anticipation.  Following up from last month’s article “Skeet Season Wrap-up”, this month’s article is focused on preparing for the upcoming skeet season.

Please refer to the previous month's article for the details of what you were supposed to do, however, to start this article off we will list the topics and the expected outcomes followed by the preparation for the new season.
Skeet Season Wrap-Up Review:

Clean and Service your Equipment: Expectation is that all your equipment is clean and ready for use.  This includes any service and adjustments to your gun.  (For questions and scheduling, please contact Gunsmiths Inc. onsite at Jacksonville Clay Target Sports, (904) 757-4584)

Review your scores and notes:  We did and have some notes suggesting what to focus on in practice.

Review of Skeet Shooting Materials:We did and have some ideas that we will incorporate into our practice.

Consider the Mental Aspect: We did and will work to incorporate some ideas into our shooting – perhaps our shot routine.

Shoot for fun!: We did – but since we are going to work on improving our skeet scores and shooting some tournaments, we will focus our “shoot time” on skeet.

Physical Fitness:  We did, and as we practice, we will see if the few exercises and stretching that we do now are helping us move smoother and be more consistent.

Consider Equipment Changes: Equipment changes are complete and we have started by shooting some rounds utilizing the new equipment and are locking down the final adjustments.

Consider Routine Changes: We will focus on this area in the remainder of the article below.

2019 Tournament Schedule: Floridians have the website https://floridaskeet.com/  saved and ready to use to view shoot flyers and register for a few shoots here at the beginning of the year.  We have selected a few tournaments such as the Fish Fry, held right here in Jacksonville, February 22nd– 24th.
Practice: If you are preparing for a tournament you need to practice.  Depending upon your level of commitment you will practice 2 – 5 times per week shooting 4 – 10 rounds as your budget and physical fitness allows.  At the more frequent amounts, it is good to have a variety of routines that you go through in order to keep the practice and shooting in general effective and fun. 

Knowing when your tournaments are, you can work backward and figure the number of times you will have to practice and outline what you do at each practice.  Ex. Shooting the different gauges, station work, shooting rounds, and doubles work.

Types of Practice:
  • Shooting only incomers around the field for a box
This is great warm up for beginning shooters similar to some of your first lessons where you selected the end stations and shot the incomers to get used to seeing, tracking and shooting a target that has a long flight path to your position.
  • Shooting only outgoers around the field for a box
The next step for beginning shooters is a warm-up where you now shoot the outgoers at each station and get used to shooting the targets moving away from your position. Some of these targets, namely High 2 and Low 6 can present some challenges as they appear to be moving very fast as they emerge into your look point.  
  • Station work – pick a station or two and shoot the entire box 
Shooters having a problem with a specific target and or station should spend some practice time focusing on that station.  This is the opportunity for the shooter to experiment with changes to foot position, hold point, look point and then to practice getting your breakpoints into the proper area. Once the tradeoffs have been explored, and each of the variables has been determined, the shooter should go on to practice and be precise with using their selected foot position, hold points, look points and breakpoints for each target or pair. This practice is one of the most effective to improve your technical skills and ultimately your confidence with each target at each station.
  • Shooting regular rounds and keeping score
This is the most used practice method and certainly is required in order to develop the endurance to move through a round handling the setup and execution of all the different types of targets. This is also a practice method that “fits into” shooting with others who may be at the range.  When shooting regular rounds and keeping a score for your journal entry, this is the time to run your shot routine with each target and be precise with your setup and execution. 
  • Shooting a regular round of doubles
For those shooting doubles at a tournament shooting regular doubles rounds where you travel from station 1 – 7 and then back to 6 – 1 is an important practice point since this and shoot-off doubles are the only events and shooting activities where the shooter moves backward through the stations.  Having familiarity and confidence to keep your hold points, leads and breakpoints sorted out takes some time.
  • Shooting doubles at stations 3,4 and 5
Shooters that compete and shoot some high scores will eventually find themselves tied with one or more competitors and be involved in a shoot-off.  The shoot-off takes place at stations 3, 4 and 5 with only doubles being thrown.  This is a “miss, and you are out” event that decides final positions overall and by class, so the pressure is high.  Shooters practice this progression shooting doubles at station 3, 4 high house target first, 5, back to station 4 low house target first, 3, back to station 4 high house target first, 5 and so on.  Shooters practice their focus and ability to be precise with their hold points, breakpoints, keep their head on the gun and follow through!
  • Shooting any of the above practice routines using the different gauges
Shooters that have the equipment to shoot the different gauges will benefit from practicing using the different gauges.  In theory, changing gauge should not make much if any of a difference since if you are on the target using 12g on down through .410 you will break it.  With that said, there are both a variety of factors around pattern size, shot string length, recoil feel and shot noise that are different however it is their impact, even in the slightest on our mental state, raising a doubt during our prep or execution that causes one or more lost targets.
 
Making the same Mistakes:  Making mistakes is going to happen, making them often may also happen because of a particular challenge on that day.  However, shooters coming each week and making the same mistakes on the same target or station nearly each round, regardless of challenges will find improving difficult until they become committed to determining the issue, and then practicing the options to solve using one or more of the above methods starting with the practice method “Station Work”. This also may involve asking for help, writing down some notes and then implementing some changes into a practice routine until you are comfortable with the solution, you are breaking the targets consistently, and your confidence has improved. 

Keep a Journal: One of the best methods to improve shooting, without actually shooting is to keep a journal of your shooting experiences in both practice and tournaments and then refer to it often.  A journal entry for practice will include the time, date, location (filed number), weather conditions, what was practiced and with what gauge and scores if they were kept.  Write down notes of how you felt regarding shooting particular targets both breaks and misses.  Write down any station work and experimenting with foot position, hold points, look points and practicing early and late target breaks.  Look over past journal entries for commonalities and see if there is a “bigger picture” that you can learn about yourself – what you do well, what needs more work.  All journal entries should be written with a positive tone which is easy when you are shooting well.  For the times or stations that are not going well, describe what you think the issue(s) are and then focus on what you believe the solutions are that then become items to focus on at the next practice.

Practice and Get Ready to Get Better!

Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American
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/blogs/news/end-of-year-letter-from-the-president 2018-12-29T21:31:00-05:00 2018-12-29T21:31:45-05:00 End of Year, Letter from the President! Jack Shooting Message from the President: 

I trust all had a great Christmas season this year!  

I want to take this opportunity to thank our outgoing Board Members: George Prattos, Mark Travis and Victor Jurban. George, Mark, and Travis have given much of themselves over many years of service to JCTS; and we are indebted to them for their unselfish contributions of treasure and talent that have significantly improved the club for the betterment of all.

I also want to welcome David Dobson, Warren “Buzz” Tyre, Kathy Barco and Congressman John Rutherford to the Board of Directors! I am thankful that we will surely benefit from their wisdom and knowledge as we move forward to enhancing our Club.

Save the date for the “Fish Fry” which the club will host from February 22nd to the 24th.

As always I want to thank everyone for their patronage to our Club and wish everyone great happiness and prosperity in 2019!!
 
See you at the Club!
Chris Kauffmann
President ]]>
/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-skeet-season-wrap-up 2018-12-03T13:00:02-05:00 2018-12-03T13:00:02-05:00 Skeet Shooting - Skeet Season Wrap-up Jack Shooting

Skeet Shooting - Skeet Season Wrap-up:  by Russ Naples, JCTS Skeet Chairman 
 
As we approach the end of the year it is also generally the end of the Skeet season from a tournament perspective.  Even if you are not shooting many or any tournaments, it is still likely a time of the year where you may be shooting less and taking a break, in favor of the various holiday events and travel.  As such this month’s article will focus on some of the items that are involved with wrapping up the skeet season allowing you to rest, review and renew.  

As we continue this article, we do it with a mindset of being grateful for our participation as well as our interactions with friends and competitors, new and old, all through the past year. 
Skeet Season Wrap-Up:
 
Clean and Service your Equipment: Now is a good time to thoroughly clean your equipment which includes all your eye and ear protection, leather pouches, shooting vests and towels.  It is also potentially time to have your gun serviced depending upon the amount of shooting you did since your last service date. At the very least, chokes can be removed and cleaned as well as the barrel threads.  When reinstalling chokes use a drop of oil on the threads. (For questions and scheduling, please contact Gunsmiths Inc. onsite at Jacksonville Clay Target Sports, (904) 757-4584)

Review your scores and notes:  For those that shot a few tournaments, you should be able to go online and review your scores across the year by the event and by gauge. If you also kept a journal you can look back across that as well to match your notes and analysis to your scores by time period.  This may provide some insight as to what habits or practice routines to continue and which to change.  If you did not shoot any tournaments and did not keep a journal, you may be able to take some time to think about when you believe that you shot better than at other times during the year and figure out why this occurred. You may also consider keeping a journal for the upcoming year so as to maximize the value of analyzing your next year of shooting.

Review of Skeet Shooting Materials: For those looking to broaden and tune their technical skills it is a good time to review books and DVDs on skeet shooting.  Several are available on the sport including from some of the top shooters in the sport such as Paul Giambrone and Todd Bender.

Consider the Mental Aspect: Throughout this past year, my articles have focused on the technical skills of Skeet shooting.  After learning the rules of the game, the technical skills of foot position, gun mount, hold point, look point, break point for each station are the next set of skills that the skeet shooter builds.  If you have been shooting consistently for at least a year; you have built a basic foundation of these technical skills and are probably starting to turn in some improved scores on a per round basis but may be experiencing inconsistency issues. Inconsistency at this stage is defined as while I have some number of misses per round, the misses are at different stations from round to round.  This inconsistency is usually attributed to two areas technical (lack of being precise with your setup) and mental (not being able to stay focused through the round on the process of shooting each target at each station).   While you work to improve your technical skills, you may consider exploring the mental aspect of the game in terms of improving focus during the preparation, execution, and reinforcement of your shots.  While there are several providers of this kind of information, I would recommend you have a look at what Lanny Bassham and his company, Mental Management Systems. 
 

 
Shoot for fun!: Enough said, just go out shoot some of the sports for fun!  This includes Skeet, Sporting Clays, Trap and if your club has it - 5-stand.  Just have fun!

Physical Fitness:  If you thought that your physical fitness impeded your ability to progress in your shooting, you may consider some stretching, exercises and light aerobics that would improve your strength (to turn with your legs and hold the gun), flexibility (to turn smoothly with your weight forward) and endurance (to be able shoot all through the day with no drop off in your scores.)  Please consult your physician for guidance as to the level of physical fitness that is best for you to pursue.

Consider Equipment Changes: After reviewing the year, consider if you will make any changes to your equipment and if so, order it or schedule it to be done during your offseason. This can include new equipment such as additional lenses for your eyewear, new molded ear plugs as well as modifications to your gun such as an adjustable butt plate and or comb. When changing the setup on your gun, it is helpful to engage the support of a gunsmith and or instructor so as to assure you have a good gun fit and mount.

Consider Equipment Changes: If you are shooting just for fun and reached this far in the article, there may be no more you wish to do.  However, if you are looking to improve your scores and potentially shoot in some local tournaments in the upcoming year then here is where you make a list of what you will do differently next year to prepare, practice and keep records.  If you have not in the past, consider keeping a journal of your shooting activities: which includes shooting for fun, tournament conditions and scores as well as outlining your practice efforts.  Thoughts on what went well, what you learned and what issues you had that you need solutions to all to belong in your journal.  

2019 Tournament Schedule: By now the tournament schedule should be available for your state.  Floridians can visit https://floridaskeet.com/  to find the calendar, shoot flyers and registration page for the first few shots of the year.  If you are a registered NSSA member with dues up to date you have access to their website and are also receiving the NSSA-NSCA Target Talk magazine both of which list tournaments planned across the United States.  Now is a good time to consider what tournaments you plan to shoot and get them into your 2019 calendar which will then help you align a practice schedule which we will discuss in next month’s article.  
Take some time off to review, rest and rejuvenate!
 
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!
 
Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American
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/blogs/news/message-from-the-president-december 2018-11-30T11:30:00-05:00 2018-11-30T11:30:00-05:00 Message From the President - December Jack Shooting I hope all had a great Thanksgiving this year!  The Club continues to grow with new shooters which we all are very happy to welcome.

The Club hosted the Emory Pappy Skeet Tournament from November 2ndto the 4th.

Alison Boyette (15 years old) from Patterson Georgia shot her first 100 straight at the “Pappy” in the 28 gauge and was gun champion. Alison also was High Overall (HOA) for the entire Tournament.
 
Pictured below are Alison Boyette in the center; and the other class HOAs from the “Pappy”
 

 From left to right: Doel Antommarchi, D Class; Russ Naples, B Class; Karen Brewer, C Class; Alison Boyette, Champion; Dave Mullarkey, Runner-Up; Cannon Petitgan, AA Class; and Steve Johnston, A Class.

As always I want to thank everyone for their patronage to our Club and wish all the very best for Christmas and the Holiday Season!
 
See you at the Club!
Chris Kauffmann
President ]]>
/blogs/news/message-from-the-president-november 2018-11-01T11:30:00-04:00 2018-11-30T11:18:44-05:00 Message From the President - November Jack Shooting I am proud to recognize our own Mark Thompson for distinguishing himself at the World Skeet Championships this year in San Antonio Texas. Mark’s accomplishments included:




Mini World:

• Class D1 for the 12 gauge with a 95 and winning that place in a 5 way shoot off!
• Class C1 in the 28 gauge with his first ever 100 straight in that Gun!
• Class C3 for High Overall (HOA)!

World:
• Class C2 in the 28 gauge with a 97!

Congratulations Mark on a superb performance!


Manager Bobby Turner and Chris Kauffmann attended the 49thAnnual National Skeet Shooting Association Hall of Fame Banquet on October 4th, 2018.  I am very proud to say that our Club was recognized as the National Club of the Year! This prestigious award is presented to only one club in the entire nation each year. Thanks to all the Life Members, Members and the public for your patronage to our Club. I want specifically to thank the JCTS Board of Directors for their support and most importantly our management team led by Bobby Turner. Bobby and his entire team are magnificent and provide all us with a quality shooting experience every day of the year!

As a reminder, the Club will be closed on Halloween this year which is on Wednesday, October 31st. We will, however, be open on Thursday, November 1st with normal hours as on a Wednesday with steak and salmon available as well. That Thursday through Sunday, November 2nd through the 4th, the Club will host the Emory Pappy Skeet Tournament.

Paul Giambrone, III, will be here to give lessons at JCTS on December 14thand 16th, with overflow on the 13th if needed. Lesson formats will be 2 shooters per half day for $400 per shooter.  Please contact Russ Naples for scheduling with LP.

A reminder to all that safety while shooting is paramount and we ask everyone to help ensure a safe environment for all on the clay target courses and fields at all times. 
 
Mark your calendars for Saturday, December 1st, 2018.  When we will hold the annual JCTS Club Championship. The format for this year will consist of 50 Sporting Clay targets, 25 Skeet targets and 25 Trap targets. The specifics for the day are forthcoming.

See you at the Club!
Chris Kauffmann
President ]]>
/blogs/news/octobers-message-from-the-president 2018-10-17T14:30:00-04:00 2018-10-17T14:30:00-04:00 October's Message from the President! Jack Shooting Message from the President: 
October 1st is the beginning of our new fiscal year and you will see a modest increase to the cost of a round of skeet/trap and a round of 5-stand/Sporting Clays.  Expense increases to include actual target costs have gone up resulting in the slight increase to the cost per round.

I want to take this opportunity to congratulate Jim Riddle who won the raffle for the Browning 725 Citori Shotgun. We will soon be starting a new raffle for a Caesar Guerini Shotgun, and this time we will also add some additional prizes to be raffled off as well.

Just to clarify, the Club was recently awarded the 2020 Junior World Skeet Championship and we are looking forward to making this a great event. The dates are still to be determined but will be during late July or early August of 2020.

As a reminder, the Club will be closed on Halloween this year which is on Wednesday, October 31st. We will, however, be open on Thursday, November 1stwith normal hours as on a Wednesday with steak and salmon available as well. That Thursday through Sunday, November 2ndthrough the 4th, the Club will host the Emory Pappy Skeet Tournament.


Paul Giambrone, III, will be here to give lessons at JCTS on December 14thand 16th, with overflow on the 13th if needed. Lesson formats will be 2 shooters per half day for $400 per shooter. 

A reminder to all that safety while shooting is paramount and we ask everyone to help ensure a safe environment for all on the clay target courses and fields at all times. 
 
Hunting season is upon us, so come on out and get some practice.
 
See you at the Club!
Chris Kauffmann
President 

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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-baseline-station-tips-part-iii 2018-10-10T12:30:00-04:00 2018-10-10T12:30:00-04:00 Skeet Shooting Baseline Station Tips: Part III Jack Shooting The Middle Stations consist of a single high house and single low house at each station for a total of 6 shots, all unique or 24% of a round of skeet (6/25).  All of these targets are crossing targets requiring significant lead.

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The previous two articles covered tips for Baseline Stations (1,7, and 8) and Transition Stations (2 and 6).  In this month’s article, we will cover tips for shooting the Middle Stations (3,4 and 5).

The Middle Stations consist of a single high house and single low house at each station for a total of 6 shots, all unique or 24% of a round of skeet (6/25).  All of these targets are crossing targets requiring significant lead.

Three additional tips before we start that apply to all targets, all stations.
  1. Know where the center of your shot pattern is so as to assure you line up the target to be in the center as you obtain lead and trigger.  Most skeet guns have a pattern that is 60/40 or more, meaning 60% of the pattern is ABOVE the bead on the end of the gun – which means when you shoot the target, the center of the pattern is such that the target is just above the bead on your gun.  To determine where your gun shoots, visit the pattern board and either use the grease or mount a piece of cardboard with a center point marked and shoot at it, then inspect the shot pattern.  Repeat and confirm where both the top and bottom barrels are shooting. If you feel there are issues, please visit Gunsmith, Inc, and discuss with Kelsey Doleo.

  2. Breathe – through the round, you should be breathing regularly. (Do not hold your breath.) Holding your breath negatively impacts your eyesight and may contribute to you obtaining the proper lead and follow through causing lost targets.

  3. Break Points – as you develop your skeet game, a reminder that optimal breakpoints are plus or minus 20’ to each side of the center stake.  Targets are broken on the same side of the field as you are shooting.  For station 4, the high house is broken on the left side, and station 4 low house is broken on the right side. 
Station 3 – High 3:
  • Stance - Use a stance that allows you to turn smoothly and completely with the legs. Right Handed shooters stance, facing your belly button slightly to the left on the low house window, left-handed shooters face belly button slightly to the right of the high house. 
  • Hold Point– 1/3 of the way from the high house to the center stake, level with the bottom of the window so as to allow your target acquisition and the beginning of the move to keep the target behind your gun at all times.  
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window up on the flight path of the target 
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes (.5 - .75 sec), call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 3’ of lead and shoot.
Station 3 – Low 3:
  • Stance - same as High 3
  • Hold Point – 10’ to the left of the low house window, level with the bottom of the window
  • Look point – halfway back to the window, up on the flight path of the target
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 3’-3 ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This is another long incomer that requires a smooth, patient move matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field.)
Station 4 – High 4:
  • Stance - Use a stance that allows you to turn smoothly and completely with the legs. Right Handed shooters stance, facing your belly button slightly to the left on the low house window, left-handed shooters face belly button slightly to the right of the high house. 
  • Hold Point– 1/3 of the way from the high house to the center stake, level with the bottom of the window so as to allow your target acquisition and the beginning of the move to keep the target behind your gun at all times. 
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window up on the flight path of the target 
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes, call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 3’-3’ ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun.
Station 4 – Low 4:
  • Stance - same as High 4
  • Hold Point – 10’ to the left of the low house window, level with the bottom of the window
  • Hold Point– 1/3 of the way from the high house to the center stake, level with the bottom of the window so as to allow your target acquisition and the beginning of the move to keep the target behind your gun at all times. 
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window up on the flight path of the target 
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes, call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 3’-3’ ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun.
Station 5 – High 5:
  • Stance - Use a stance that allows you to turn smoothly and completely with the legs. Right Handed shooters stance, facing your belly button slightly to the left on the low house window, left-handed shooters to face belly button slightly to the right of the high house. 
  • Hold Point – 10’ to the left of the low house window, level with the bottom of the window
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window up on the flight path of the target 
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 3’-3 ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This is another long incomer that requires a smooth, patient move matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field.)
Station 5 – Low 5:
  • Stance – similar to High 3
  • Hold Point– 1/3 of the way from the high house to the center stake, level with the bottom of the window so as to allow your target acquisition and the beginning of the move to keep the target behind your gun at all times. 
  • Look point – halfway back to the window, up on the flight path of the target
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes, call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 3’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun.
This completes our 3-article series for shooting a round of skeet.
  • Baseline Station Tips (1,7,8) published in the August Newsletter.
  • Transition Station Tips (2,6) published in the September Newsletter.
  • Middle Station Tips (3,4,5) published this month, October Newsletter.
Next month stay tuned for an article on Shoot off Doubles at Stations 3,4,5.
Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American
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/blogs/news/want-to-learn-from-paul-l-p-giambrone-heres-your-chance 2018-09-28T13:00:00-04:00 2018-11-01T20:24:18-04:00 Want To Learn From Paul "L.P." Giambrone? Here's Your Chance! Jack Shooting (rnaples19@hotmail.com)]]> /blogs/news/september-letter-from-the-president 2018-09-17T20:00:00-04:00 2018-09-17T20:00:00-04:00 September Letter from the President Jack Shooting I hope all of you had a great summer. All members should have received your 2019 invoice in the mail; if not please let us know. For those of you who are not current members, you can get the month of September 2018 included in your 2019 membership if you sign up now.

The calendar for special events is filling up rapidly; if you would like to schedule a special event please get with our manager, Bobby Turner.

The Club was recently awarded the 2020 Junior World Skeet Championship and we are looking forward to making this a great event.

For planning purposes, the Club will be closed on Halloween this year which is on Wednesday, October 31st. We will, however, be open on Thursday, November 1stwith normal hours as on a Wednesday with steak and salmon available as well.

Thanks again to all for your patronage to our Club; as always if you have any recommendations please let us know.

A reminder to all that safety while shooting is paramount and we ask everyone to help ensure a safe environment for all on the clay target courses and fields at all times.

See you at the Club!
Chris Kauffman
President 

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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-baseline-station-tips-part-ii 2018-09-12T00:00:00-04:00 2018-09-17T18:22:47-04:00 Skeet Shooting Baseline Station Tips: Part II Jack Shooting
Skeet Shooting Baseline Station Tips:  
by Russ Naples, JCTS Skeet Chairman 
 
In last month’s article, Baseline Station Tips, for training purposes, we broke a round of skeet into 3 sections, Baseline Stations (1,7 and 8), Transition Stations (2 and 6) and Middle Stations (3,4, and 5) and discussed key tips for the Baseline station targets.  In this month’s article, we will cover some key tips for the Transition Stations (2 and 6).

Before we continue let’s remember that in skeet we know where the targets are coming from, (high house and low house), their flight path, (over the center stake) and when they will fly, (on your call). In addition, each high house target comes at the same speed and each low house target comes at the same speed assuming weather and machine adjustment are not altered during our round.  So, if the targets are coming at the same speed and general trajectory then why is it that certain targets appear faster than others as we shoot our round?  The answer to this question is that it is because of our position on the field changes in relation to the house that the target is emerging from.  When the targets are flying generally away from or toward the shooter, the speed is not generally perceived versus when we are at some of the other stations – 2 through 6.  High 2 and Low 6 are targets that appear to be moving very fast since the stations are positioned close to the house and we are looking at the target traveling across our vision. 

The transition stations, Stations 2 and 6, each consist of 2 unique targets and a pair for a total of 8 targets (4 unique) or 32% of a round. (8/25) Targets at these stations are often considered by shooters as very challenging. High 2 often presents an additional challenge since it can be considered the first target within the round that appears to be traveling much faster than the targets encountered at station 1.  Given these factors, some shooters get surprised by the speed and end up having to make a very fast and jerky move in order to catch up and shoot the target. This move often results in a miss either behind because the shooter never caught up with the target or ahead because the shooters momentum carried too far in front of the target. Either way, when the move is not smooth and you need to have a barrel speed that is either faster or slower than the target, the probability of success is lower as compared to a smooth move that matches gun speed with target speed, the shooter obtains the correct lead, shoots and follows through.
Key Tips for Stations 2 and 6:
Station 2 – High 2:
  • Stance – Feet shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent, 60/40 weight shift on your front foot and turn smoothly with the legs. Right Handed shooters “open” our stance, facing your belly button slightly to the left on the low house window, left-handed shooters face belly button slightly to the right of the high house. 
  • Hold Point– parallel with the high house + 3’ towards the center of the field, level with the bottom of the window so as to allow you to see the target and begin the move while keeping the gun ahead of the target at all times.  
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window up on the flight path of the target 
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes (.5 - .75 sec), call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 6” – 1’ of lead and shoot.
Station 2 – Low 2:
  • Stance - same as High 2
  • Hold Point – 10’ to the left of the low house window, level with the bottom of the window
  • Look point – halfway back to the window, up on the flight path of the target
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 1’-1 ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This is another long incomer that is a great target for us to practice patience, matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field.)
Station 2 – Double
  • Stance, Hold Point and Look Point – same as High 2
  • Shot execution – settle, call, shoot when the target comes into your look point, with head tight on the gun, gun moves to the center of the field, eyes shift up to the center of the field, find, track and shoot Low 2 the same as the single.
 
Station 6 – High 6:
  • Stance – Feet shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent, 60/40 weight shift on your front foot and turn smoothly with the legs.  Right Handed shooters belly button to the left of the low house window, left-handed shooters face belly button slightly to the right of the high house window.
  • Hold Point– 10‘ to the right of the high house window, level with the bottom of the window. 
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window, up on the flight path
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 1’-1 ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This is another long incomer that is a great target for us to practice patience, matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field.)
Station 6 – Low 6:
  • Stance - same as High 6. Right Handed shooters “close” our stance, facing your belly button on the low house window, left-handed shooters face straight out to the open field.
  • Hold Point– parallel with the high house + 3’ towards the center of the field, level with the bottom of the window so as to allow your target acquisition and the beginning of the move to keep the target behind your gun at all times. 
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window up on the flight path of the target 
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes (.5 - .75 sec), call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 6” – 1’ of lead and shoot.
Station 6 – Double:
  • Stance, Hold Point, Look Point – same as Low 6
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes (.5 - .75 sec), call for the target, when the target comes into your look point, begin your move, match gun speed with target speed, obtain 6” – 1’ of lead and shoot, head stays on the gun, eyes shift up, find, track H6 across the field, obtain 1’-1 ½’ of lead, shoot and follow through with head tight on the gun.
Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American

 
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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-baseline-station-tips 2018-08-18T12:30:00-04:00 2018-09-17T18:23:10-04:00 Skeet Shooting Baseline Station Tips: Part I Jack Shooting A common problem-solving technique that we can apply involves stating the challenge and then breaking it down into some smaller components, which often become more manageable to address. 

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Skeet Shooting Baseline Station Tips:  by Russ Naples, JCTS Skeet Chairman 
 
As we build our Skeet game we look to reduce the many variables involved in shooting a single or a pair.  A common problem-solving technique that we can apply involves stating the challenge and then breaking it down into some smaller components, which often become more manageable to address.  In the analysis of a round of skeet we find that there are 16 unique singles shots, add 4 pairs at stations 1,2, 6 and 7 and if you are straight we take our option shot at a 2ndlow 8 target which gets us to a total of 25 shots. As we train to improve our technical skills it is useful to group similar stations together.  One method is to group stations 1, 7, and 8 together as Baseline Stations, stations 2 and 6 together as Transition Stations and finally stations 3, 4 and 5 together as our Middle Stations.   For this month we will focus on tips to improve our baseline station proficiency.

The baseline stations, 1, 7 and 8 consist of 10 targets, 6 unique singles shots, and a pair at stations 1 and 7. These 10 targets represent 40% of the 25-shot round, and if we are straight the 2nd low 8 target brings us up to a total of 11 targets and 44% of the round shot on the baseline.  Many shooters who have been shooting awhile agree that most of these targets are less challenging than targets at the other stations, so if we have a small goal to be “clean” at these stations we can then focus on the remaining challenging targets.  
Let’s cover some key tips at stations 1,7 and 8:

Station 1 – High 1:
  • Stance - Use a stance that allows you to turn smoothly and completely in the event that the low 1 on the double comes across low and fast. Right Handed shooters “open” our stance, facing your belly button slightly to the left on the low house window, left-handed shooters face straight out to the open field.
  • Hold Point– usually a 45-degree angle but be conservative to not hold too high so that the target does not come out and fly under your barrel. 
  • Look point – After you line the beads up, the look point is 3” above the barrel
  • Shot Execution - settle your eyes (.5 - .75 sec), call for the target, when the target comes into your look point assure you are lined up and shoot.
Station 1 – Low 1:
  • Stance - same as High 1
  • Hold Point – 10’ to the left of the low house window, level with the bottom of the window
  • Look point – halfway back to the window, up on the flight path of the target
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 6” – 1’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This long incomer is a great target for us to practice patience, matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field.)
Station 1 – Double
  • Stance, Hold Point and Look Point – same as High 1
  • Shot execution – settle, call, shoot when high 1 comes into your look point, with head tight on the gun, the gun moves lower, eyes shift up to the center of the field, find, track and shoot Low 1 the same as the single.
Station 7 – High 7
  • Stance - Use a stance that allows you to turn smoothly and completely in the event that high 7 on the double comes across low and fast. Right Handed shooters face straight out to the open field, left-handed shooters face belly button slightly to the right of the high house window.
  • Hold Point– 10‘ to the right of the high house window, level with the bottom of the window. 
  • Look point – Halfway back to the window, up on the flight path
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point bring it across to your side of the field, matching gun speed with target speed, obtain 6” – 1’ of lead, shoot and follow through with your head on the gun. (This long incomer is a great target for us to practice patience, matching gun speed with target speed, keeping our head on the gun all the way across the field.)
 

Station 7 – Low 7:
  • Stance - same as High 7
  • Hold Point – about a 45-degree angle, aligned with the expected flight of the target (usually over the center stake) being conservative to assure that the target comes out above the gun and you make an adjustment up to the target.
  • Look point – just above the barrel on the expected flight path of the target, soft focus out in the distance
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point, soft focus transitions to hard focus making any adjustment to align the target just above the bead of the gun and shoot.
Station 7 – Double
  • Stance, Hold Point, Look Point – same as Low 7
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target comes into your look point, soft focus transitions to hard focus making any adjustment to align the target just above the bead of the gun and shoot, head stays on the gun, eyes shift up, find, track H7 across the field, obtain 6’-1’ of lead, shoot and follow through with head tight on the gun.
Station 8 – High 8:
  • Stance – Right handed shooters face out to the field, left-handed shooters take a stance with belly button slightly to the right of the high house window so as to allow a smooth tracking of the target. 
  • Hold Point – 4’ to the right and level with the bottom of the window (alignment is close to the center stake on the adjacent field if available.)
  • Look point – in the window 
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target appears, begin your move bringing the gun straight up, cover the target, shoot, follow through with your head on the gun.
Station 8 – Low 8
  • Stance – Right handed shooters belly button slightly to the left of the low house window, left-handed shooters face out to the field so as to allow smooth tracking of the target. 
  • Hold Point – 4’ to the left and no higher than the middle of the window (alignment is close to the center stake on the adjacent field if available.)
  • Look point – in the window 
  • Shot Execution – settle, call and when the target appears, begin your move bringing the gun straight up, cover the target, shoot, follow through with your head on the gun.
Hopefully, you are straight and get to shoot
at a 2nd low 8 for a “25”!

 
Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American

 
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/blogs/news/shoot-for-railynn-a-success 2018-07-04T00:29:00-04:00 2018-07-04T00:31:31-04:00 Shoot For Railynn - A Success Sara Lawrence More

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The JCTS Staff had a great turnout for the Shoot For Railynn Sporting Clays Shoot, Friday, June 29.  It was an exciting morning as Intrepid Capital took first place, Team Rutherford claimed second, and Wild West Guns & Gold grabbed third place!  Congratulations to Jack Teague who earned Men's HOA, while Sherry Davidson won Women's HOA.  Marcus Fennell won the Glock 43 Raffle, which he then offered up for auction. Shaun Thomas triumphed in the auction to became the owner of the Glock 43. Bobby Turner, Tony Knight, and Sara Lawrence extend their gratitude to all sponsors and competitors who came out to help raise funds to alleviate the medical expenses of five-year old Railynn.
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/blogs/news/zone-4-skeet-championship-1 2018-07-03T23:33:00-04:00 2018-07-03T23:33:36-04:00 Zone 4 Skeet Championship Sara Lawrence More

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Zone 4 Skeet shooters are getting ready for the 2018 NSSA Zone 4 Championship. The Zone will be held at Imperial Polk Gun Club, July 27 - 29, 2018, and will be in the iShoot format again this year.  Registration is available at the NSSA Zone 4 iShoot site.  We look forward to seeing you there!

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/blogs/news/july-news-and-events 2018-07-03T23:25:00-04:00 2018-07-03T23:26:10-04:00 July News and Events Sara Lawrence JCTS  President

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We wish everyone a Happy Independence Day! Due to Fourth of July celebrations, JCTS will close at 6:00pm on Wednesday, July 4th. We will be open all other business hours as usual this week.

In between family visits and travels, schedule some clay target time for yourself during these long summer days!  This is a great time of the year to improve your game, get some professional coaching, and make equipment upgrades or adjustments. Summer is also a great time to introduce friends or family members to clay target sports.

You will want to keep your game in shape for the upcoming season and events at JCTS, including the 
NSSA Zone 4 Skeet Championship (July 27 - 29), the Sept. 22 Fall Duster Sporting Clays Shoot, and the Nov. 2 Emory Pappy Skeet Championship.  Keep an eye on our Fall calendar so you don't miss any fun events.We wish our collegiate teams the best as they prepare to travel to Marengo, Ohio for the SCTP Nationals 7/14 - 7/21.

Reservations are being taken for corporate and non-profit events for the Fall/Winter season.  Call the Pro Shop to reserve a date for your organization.  More event planning information is available on the website.

Volunteers for club events are encouraged, as well as your recommendations and suggestions for club management.  Please read on to enjoy news from the many different sports and activities at JCTS.  We hope to see you at the club soon!

Chris Kauffmann
President
904-757-4584

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/blogs/news/sporting-clays-news-2 2018-07-03T23:20:00-04:00 2018-07-03T23:20:46-04:00 Sporting Clays News Sara Lawrence More

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Summer is a great time to practice your sporting clays technique!  JCTS management and trappers keep the traps in top condition to provide an invigorating experience for you!  You can tune up your skills and reflexes before hunting season on the tree-covered North Course or plantation-style South Course.  JCTS provides a convenient sporting experience with Pro Shop, NSSA-NSCA certified instructorson-site gunsmith, golf carts, Rugged Gear caddies, and more to facilitate a comfortable sporting experience for all.

Our new Sporting Clays Chairman, Dave Dobson, is working on plans to ensure an exciting year-round sporting clays experience at JCTS. Dave welcomes any comments or suggestions toward these goals. 

The JCTS Fall and Winter calendars are filling up. If your company or organization would like to hold an event at JCTS in the coming year (2018 - 2019), call the Pro Shop to reserve a date  [904-757-4584]. 

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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-handling-distractions 2018-07-03T23:14:00-04:00 2018-07-04T01:05:15-04:00 Skeet Shooting: Handling Distractions Sara Lawrence More

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Distractions; we all have heard stories of how distraction “x” or distraction “y” caused a shooter to lose one or more targets and negatively impact their score.  The more conversation on the distraction, the more influential it becomes on your game – and typically in a negative way.  A general definition of a distraction is “something that prevents someone from giving their full attention to something else” and for a skeet shooter, that something else is our game plan, shot routine, our process for shooting a target, station and a round of skeet. 


In skeet shooting, distractions are inevitable.  Some you can plan ahead to handle, while others can only be dealt with when they occur. Three common types of distractions are the field, weather and people. Field distractions include the background and general markers (or lack thereof) on the field.  Weather distractions include excessive heat or cold, rain, wind and for those outside of Florida – snow.  People distractions include other shooters on an unfamiliar squad, the referee and some within the audience that may be observing.    
We cannot control distractions, but we can control how we react to the distractions.  So how do we handle ourselves when distractions occur?  We observe and acknowledge the distraction, make our adjustments as necessary and get on with our shot routine. Period. Anything more, especially becoming irritated, only fuels the degree to which the distraction negatively impacts our shooting.  In addition, any further conversation about the distraction should be framed from a positive and constructive position with the shooter feeling in control with the ability to make one or more adjustments.  Handling the distraction in this manner and limiting our reaction to it diffuses the distraction and minimizes its impact on our game.  Read article here.

By Russ Naples

Previous articles in series:
Skeet Shooting Fundamentals, April 2018 
A Closer Look At Shot Routine, May 2018
Tips For A Good Start,  June 2018

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/blogs/news/sctp-collegiate-championship 2018-07-03T22:58:00-04:00 2018-07-03T22:58:43-04:00 SCTP Collegiate Championship Sara Lawrence More

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SCTP Collegiate / High School National Championships
 
July will be an exciting month for our collegiate shooters. July 14 - 21, the country's best collegiate and high school shooting teams gather at the Cardinal Shooting Center (Marengo, OH) for the SCTP National Championships.  JU is a defending SCTP HOA  National Champion in several of the events and will be expected to bring home the GOLD again. This year, approximately 2,800 athletes are expected to compete from around the nation to be attending the SCTP Nationals, including many of  the major powerhouse collegiate teams. 

David T. Dobson
JU Faculty & JU Varsity Shooting Team Head Coach

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/blogs/news/hurricane-preparedness 2018-07-03T22:27:00-04:00 2018-07-03T22:29:47-04:00 Hurricane Preparedness Sara Lawrence More

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Cataloging Service, Restorations:

As hurricane season is underway, it is extremely important that firearm owners are well prepared and have accurate records of your firearms. Having photos of each firearm with the make, model, and serial number with an estimated value can save you thousands of dollars when dealing with insurance claims should disaster strike. Gunsmiths Inc. can help you with this process, we also offer a service for cataloging your collection in case the task is too large and time consuming for you. Last year we experienced many unfortunate cases where firearms had been damaged and there was no original record of the condition or worth before the hurricane stormed in. We were able to save and restore many, but the original value was lost without the proper records. Restoration of firearms is also a common service we offer and entails many hours of dedicated effort. Every restoration is performed completely by hand to properly reinstate the firearm to its former glory. Following is an example of a recent restoration process from start to finish.  
Happy Shooting and we look forward to seeing you at the club!! 
Kelsey Doleo
Gunsmiths Inc.

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/blogs/news/new-blog-attempt-with-lyn-m 2018-06-12T11:07:00-04:00 2018-06-12T11:07:30-04:00 Shoot For Railynn Sporting Clays Sara Lawrence More

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Grab your friends for a worthwhile Friday morning at JCTS. The Staff of JCTS invites you to join them in a sporting clays shoot to assist a young friend in her battle against leukemia. On Friday, June 29, we will take on the North Sporting Clays Course at 9am, followed by lunch, awards, and fellowship. Your participation in this shoot will allow Railynn to receive vital medical care in her fight against this disease. Many different sponsorship levels are available, and registration can be made at the JCTS Pro Shop. You can register as a squad of four or as an individual.
Event Sponsor: $4,000 - includes
* Two 4-person teams, shells, and lunch,
* Event sponsor recognition,
* Display of company sign all weekend,
* Speaking opportunity at lunch or awards.

Lunch Sponsor: $2,000 - includes
* One 4-person team, shells, and lunch,
* Lunch Sponsor recognition,
* Display of company sign in clubhouse,
* Display of comapny sign on North Course all weekend.

Golf Cart Sponsor: $2,000 - includes
* One 4-person team, shells, and lunch,
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/blogs/news/zone-4-skeet-championship 2018-06-06T21:50:00-04:00 2018-06-06T21:51:21-04:00 Zone 4 Skeet Championship! Sara Lawrence More

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We are all looking forward to the 2018 NSSA Zone 4 Championship. The Zone will be held at Imperial Polk Gun Club, July 27 - 29, 2018, and will be in the iShoot format again this year.  Registration is available at the NSSA Zone 4 iShoot site.  So get yourself ready, and get signed up!

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/blogs/news/presidents-news-june 2018-06-06T21:29:00-04:00 2018-06-06T23:09:39-04:00 President's News - June Sara Lawrence More

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JCTS has come though a very busy Spring season with great success due to our dedicated staff and enthusiastic members and guests!  Summer's arrival provides us with a great time to improve our games, get some professional coaching, and make equipment upgrades or adjustments. Summer is also a great time to introduce friends or family members to clay target sports.

Our JCTS Staff will host the Shoot For Railynn Sporting Clays Shoot on Friday, June 29.  Railynn is a five year old friend who is battling leukemia.  More information on how to participate in this shoot is presented below. 

There are lots of upcoming events to get your game in shape for, including the NSSA Zone 4 Championship (July 27 - 29), the Fall Duster Sporting Clays Shoot (Sept. 22), and the Emory Pappy Skeet Championship (Nov. 2 - 4).  We wish our collegiate teams the best as they prepare to travel to Marengo, Ohio for the SCTP Nationals  July14 - 21.

We are pleased to offer the Promatic Claymate wireless system on all skeet fieldsAdditional improvements and upgrades will take place on the skeet fields throughout the summer.  Our Sporting Clays Chairman, Dave Dobson has formed a working group for improving our sporting clays experience on both courses, and will develop a strategic plan. He is reaching out to FSCA and NSCA to increase awareness of our facility, and plans continuous improvements to the individual stations and their evolving target presentations. Dave welcomes any comments or suggestions. Stay tuned for continued updates. 

Reservations are being taken for corporate and non-profit events for the Fall/Winter season.  Call the Pro Shop to reserve a date for your organization.  More event planning information is available on the website.

Volunteers and recommendations on club events or operations are always welcomed!  Come out to see us soon! 

Chris Kauffmann
President
904-757-4584

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/blogs/news/mark-your-calendars 2018-06-06T21:20:00-04:00 2018-06-06T21:24:34-04:00 Mark Your Calendars! Sara Lawrence More

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JCTS Pro Shop is accepting reservations for 2018 - 2019 events and rentals.

June 2 - 3  NSSA/FSA Junior Skeet Camp - Palatka
June   8     Belles With Shells Shoot-n-network
June 14 + 16  
FWC Hunter Safety Course
June  29       Shoot For Railynn Sporting Clays event
July    4         Independence Day - Early closing
                     JCTS Open  -  Noon  to  6:00pm
July 7 + 14    
FWC Hunter Safety Course
July 20          Belles with Shells Shoot-n-network
July 27 - 29  
Zone 4 Skeet Championship at
                      Imperial Polk Gun Club, Winter Haven, FL
August 17      Belles with Shells Shoot-n-network
Aug. 23 + 25  FWC Hunter Safety Course
9/28  - 10/5   NSSA World Skeet Championship
                     National Shooting Complex
Sept.   22      Fall Duster Sporting Clays Shoot - NSCA
Oct.  19 - 21  Collegiate Fall Regional Tournament
Oct. 20 - 28   NSCA World Championship
                      National Shooting Complex
Nov.  2 - 4    Emory Pappy Memorial Skeet Championship

Wednesday Night Dinners!
Grill your choice of steak or salmon with sides
Fields open until 8:30pm; sporting clays courses open until dusk.


Go to JCTS Calendar

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/blogs/news/sporting-clays-history-at-jcts 2018-06-06T20:59:00-04:00 2018-06-12T11:08:44-04:00 Sporting Clays History at JCTS! Sara Lawrence More

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History was made at the Smack Em Down Sporting Clays Shoot on May 19. Todd Simmons (right) shot a perfect 100!! on the North Course, as well as a 95 on the South Course!  TJ Hawk (left) and Johnny Turner (center) claimed second and third places, respectively. Congratulations to everyone who joined us for the May Smack Em Down.  Be sure to put the September 22 Fall Duster Shoot on your calendar. 

New JCTS Sporting Clays Chairman, Dave Dobson, is working with club management to keep the courses challenging and exciting for all.  The slower pace during the summer provides a great opportunity to enjoy the sporting clays courses and work on your game.

If your company or organization would like to hold an event at JCTS in the coming year (2018 - 2019), call the Pro Shop to reserve a date  [904-757-4584]. 

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/blogs/news/2018-2019-event-reservations 2018-06-06T20:48:00-04:00 2018-06-06T20:50:09-04:00 2018-2019 Event Reservations Sara Lawrence More

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JCTS is accepting reservations for event rentals for the 2018 - 2019 season
Call the Pro Shop to reserve a date for your business, organization, or group!
904-757-4584.
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/blogs/news/training-instruction 2018-06-06T20:46:00-04:00 2018-06-06T20:46:06-04:00 Training & Instruction Sara Lawrence More

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JCTS has all the resources that new and experienced athletes need to enjoy the sport. Along with many other amenities, JCTS is fortunate to offer the services of eight NSSA/NSCA Certified Instructors.  This summer is the perfect time to learn a new sport, introduce friends to these sports, or  tune up your game with the help of an instructor!  The full list of instructors is available on JCTS website.

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/blogs/news/collegiate-news-june 2018-06-06T20:38:00-04:00 2018-06-06T20:38:47-04:00 Collegiate News - June Sara Lawrence More

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The Collegiate shooting season will be taking a slight breather as we enter the summer months, but not for long! Our season kicks off again in a few weeks with the  SCTP High School and Collegiate Nationals in Marengo, Ohio from July 14 thru July 21.  JU is a defending SCTP HOA  Collegiate National Champion in several of events and will be expected to bring home the GOLD again, in spite of the fact that they will be missing the amazing talents of  this past year’s  JUSSTC  Captain, Kelby Seanor. Kelby will be in France as a member of TeamUSA participating in the World FITASC event.     

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/blogs/news/skeet-shooting-tips-for-a-good-start 2018-06-06T20:35:00-04:00 2018-06-06T20:35:37-04:00 Skeet Shooting: Tips For A Good Start Sara Lawrence More

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Skeet Shooting: Tips for a Good Start
Third article in series by Russ Naples, JCTS Skeet Chairman

These tips are the next steps in improving your skeet game, following the shot routine recommendations that were shared in my April and May articles.

How many times on an early miss (station 1 or 2) have we heard or said ourselves “I called for it, but I was not ready” – "Why did I do that?" Or worse…  This happens to all of us at some point, although we prefer that it happen in practice than at an event. 

There are two very common reasons for early misses: one is that our eyes are not accustomed to tracking the speed of the targets and we miss the pick up of the target within our look point, see the streak, and then chase the target across the field and either miss behind or our barrel blows past the target, misses ahead, in our effort to chase, both resulting in a lost target.  The second most common reason is that we forget to execute one or more of the steps in our shot routine. Reminder: Whether we achieve a hit or a miss, our score is an outcome.  We cannot control outcomes, we can control process.  Our process is our shot routine.  

As discussed in previous articles our shot routines include a number of items such as foot position, gun mount, hold point, look point, and these are all before we even call for the target.  In addition, we look to settle our eyes, focus, match gun speed with target speed, obtain the lead, trigger and follow through.  There certainly are quite a few items for us to consider and in order to help us keep organized it was suggested that we have a “shot routine”, i.e. have a plan for each shot.  The good news is that while there may be several items to keep track of – they are in the same order for each station and for each like station, like shot (i.e. Station 2, High 2) the details such as foot position, hold point, and look point lead are the same.

Tips for a good start:

  1. As you approach the field with your equipment, take time to see other shooters targets.  Use a look point outside the window, up on the flight path, and have your eye acquire and track some targets across the field. This helps your eyes adjust to the speed of the targets that you will shoot on this field.    
  2. Analyze the weather (sun, wind, rain) their effects on the targets and decide any modifications to hold points and look points that you will make during your round.  Prepare and put on your shooting glasses at least 15 minutes ahead of your start so that your eyes adjust to the lens.  Lens Selection Tip: My preference is to shoot with the lightest lens possible without squinting. (Squinting causes your eyes to tire and can contribute to missed targets.)  For up close green backgrounds I have had success with a purple tint.  For sky backgrounds (blues) I use the red chromatic or orange tint lens. Not everyone has the same type of vision so review the recommendation and select what can work best for you.
  3. As you prepare to start the round, take extra time to walk through your pre-shot routine. Consider executing your pre-shot routine twice on the first station.  Unless you are shooting first you will have a bit more time before your turn, and you will be able to see a few extra targets in order to get your eyes engaged tracking the targets.  If you are shooting first and you are in practice, take some extra time on station one and consider it a challenge to have a clean station. If you are at an event, you will be allowed some targets for tracking, typically a high, low and a pair.  As you call for the targets; acquire and track them all the way across the field watching them land at or near the distance markers.
  4. Before your round starts and while the field is unoccupied, check your hold points at stations 2,3,4,5, and 6.  Everyone may have different methods, but all shooters can benefit from having a look at each of the stations to become familiar with where they plan to setup their hold points.
  5. Have a shot strategy for the first station (s) to ensure your success. Station 1: High 1 – get the hold point right - angle of the gun ~45deg, but such that the target does not blow past your barrel to where you have to chase it.  I usually choose a slightly lower gun angle to protect against a target that comes out flat and or falls fast at least for the first round.  Get the look point right.  The look point for high 1 is NOT down the barrel lining up the beads, rather it is above the barrel ~3” – when you call for the target as it enters your look point you pull the trigger.  Depending on the weather sun/wind you need to focus and sometimes be patient for a target that floats. Low 1 – Do not “rest” on this easy in comer – rather use it as a target where you practice your tracking to follow this long in comer across the field, into your break zone and finishing with a nice follow through with your head on the gun.  Now that you saw a high 1, setup and execute your double with a more accurate hold point and look point on high 1, and then follow through, head on the gun to complete the 2nd target of the pair - low 1.
  6. Station 2: High 2 – we all know that due to our position on the field this target appears to move very quickly.  For the first round, my recommendation is to NOT challenge this target and move the hold point out from the window some small amount ~1 barrel width or 1” from your normal hold point.
With all of the best laid plans, misses will happen on occasion and when they do it is important for us to deal with these early misses properly so as to not have them negatively impact the remainder of the round.

Tips for completing the round after a miss:
  1. Early misses tend to effect shooters more since there is “more” of the round remaining. You may use an early miss as motivation and consider it a constructive challenge to remain clean through the rest of the round. Shooters that pile up “24’s” will progress faster in their game than shooters who allow one miss to contribute to a second miss.  (Do not turn one miss into two misses.)
  2. With your first miss you will need to take your option shot on that same target.  Consider to reload your gun so as to give yourself some extra time to evaluate the adjustment(s) you need to make in order to have a successful option shot.
  3. Stick with your shot routine, complete your option and station, come off the station and visualize the successful process used for your option shot and any of the targets on that station.
  4. Focus forward on what you need to do on the next station, next target. Focus on the process, your shot routine, for the next station. Any lingering thoughts about the previous miss will only take away mental energy from the task at hand and further put you at risk of losing another target. (There is no value to your skeet game in continuing to think about the lost target.)
  5. Approach the remaining rounds with confidence since you have made adjustments from the previous miss and have a shot routine that has you focus on process that gives you the best chance of a successful outcome.
Hit 'em hard!


Russ Naples
JCTS Skeet Chairman
NSSA Certified Instructor
Four-time NSSA First Team All American

Previous articles in series:
Skeet Shooting Fundamentals, April 2018 
A Closer Look At Shot Routine, May 2018]]>